Common Kitchen and Bathroom Cabinet Features

If you’re shopping for new cabinets, you’ll likely encounter terminology you may be unfamiliar with. Knowing the most common kitchen and bathroom cabinet features will help you decide which cabinetry will best suit your home, style and budget. Drawer Fronts Many details can be customized on drawer fronts, especially the outside face edge for most styles. This can be especially useful when matching with existing cabinetry or specific design requests. Solid drawer fronts are the most traditional. Sometimes referred to as slab front drawers, they’re sold with a wide range of options. This simple style allows you to get creative with colors and and types of wood. Five-piece drawer fronts are constructed with a frame and center panel, creating a look similar to cabinet doors. The size of the frame is usually reduced to allow for smaller heights that drawer fronts typically require. Three-piece drawer fronts are versatile enough to fit both traditional and modern styles. With straight lines and right angles, this design is attractive and clean. Routed drawer fronts are a step higher in cabinetry design than solid drawer fronts due to the added detail. Flat pieces of wood or laminate are routed on the edges. Usually the drawer fronts are made with the same edge design as the cabinet doors. Additional designs may be carved into these drawer fronts if desired Door Overlay The overlay dimension is simply how much bigger the door is than the opening of the cabinet. Full overlay draws attention to the door and drawer design, creating a seamless look. This type of cabinetry covers the entire face frame in framed construction...

How to Choose Kitchen Cabinets

If you’re remodeling your kitchen or building a new home, there’s a lot to consider. The kitchen is one of the most frequently used rooms in the house, so it has to be functional. And, if you ever decide to sell, kitchens are one of the main rooms that can impact your home’s value and appeal to potential buyers. The flooring, countertops, backsplash and appliances can’t be placed until the cabinets go in, so they’re usually the first thing you’ll select. Here are some things to consider when choosing kitchen cabinets. Materials Solid wood, plywood with a laminate or melamine veneer, thermofoil, MDF and particleboard are most common. Solid wood or veneered plywood cabinets are the most long-lasting options. Cherry is a common wood choice if you want a dark, rich finish, while bamboo and mahogany offer a more exotic look. Maple and poplar are lighter woods that are often used with more natural finishes, or for cabinets that will be painted. Most cabinets you’ll find today have overlay doors, with the drawer fronts and doors either partially or fully covering the cabinet box. Partially overlaid doors and drawers have part of the cabinet frame showing around the edges, and the door hinges are usually visible, too. Euro-style or full overlay doors, on the other hand, cover the front of the cabinet box completely. This is type used for modern-style cabinetry, and the space inside is slightly more accessible. A less common, and more expensive, cabinet door style is inset. These doors are installed inside the door opening, and they sit flush with the font of the cabinet. They...

Finish Options for Unfinished Cabinets

When purchasing unfinished cabinets, there are lots of options for applying a finish to them. You can choose from a wide variety of finishes, including: paint, stain, glaze, oil and polyurethane. Finishing your cabinets doesn’t require special tools or lots of experience. With a little research you can finish your cabinets like a pro. Here is a guide to choosing your finish before you get started. Paint Finish Painting cabinets gives them a clean, classic style and seemingly endless color options. The kind of paint used will affect how they look, wear and their resistance to moisture. Oil or water-based paint may include resins to help with curing. Painted cabinets have an opaque color and the wood grain doesn’t show through. Hairline cracks show up in the finish surface at door joints. This is normal and doesn’t affect the strength of the wood. Stain Finish Staining shows the natural grain of the wood while also allowing for a wide variety of colors. Stains combined with stylistic techniques like glazing, distressing, antiquing or fly specking can be used to customize cabinets. Wood characteristics are more prominent, giving lighter or darker effects. The stain color can vary on the different parts of the wood. Gel Stain Finish Easy application for vertical surfaces. Distributes color evenly on wood. Allows better color control during application. Can also be applied to metal, veneer and fiberglass to give them a wood-like appearance. Glazing Applied over paints and stains to add detail. Appears darker in crevices and highlights wood grain variations. Displays slight variations with each application. Creates a subtle brushed look. Brushed variations mean no...

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